Post-GC2019 Reflection: Angry but not Giving Up

Posted: 2019/03/25 in Church, Ecclesiology

A man with a skin disease approached Jesus, fell to his knees, and begged, “If you want, you can make me clean.”
Incensed, Jesus reached out his hand, touched him, and said, “I do want to.  Be clean.”  Instantly, the skin disease left him, and he was clean.  (Mark 1:40-42)

Jesus wasn’t miffed or a little annoyed.  He was incensed–enraged, angered, feeling a moment of “don’t even mess with me” pique.  By the time we get to this scene, Jesus had seen a lot of sick and disabled people with both physical and mental illnesses.  When yet one more sick man approaches Jesus, he gets lit and loses his temper.  While we might interpret his rage as a kind of holy anger at the world’s brokenness displayed in the begging man, I suspect he might have simply had enough of dealing with sickness and disease and flashed into anger.

At that moment he had a choice.  He could, as angry people often do, walk away.  The other option, the one that he chose, was to do something about the need and brokenness before him.  He channeled his anger into a furious fit of healing and cured the man’s skin disease.  In other words, he didn’t walk away but remained to do what he could to make things better.

Right now, church congregations, factions within churches, families, and individuals incensed, enraged, angered, disappointed, frustrated, and/or saddened by GC2019’s decision to retain The Discipline‘s ban on gay clergy and same-gender marriage are contemplating leaving The United Methodist Church.  I understand, or am trying as best I can.  It’s an understandable reaction.

A reaction–but not a response.

If anyone reading this is in the midst of this reaction, please hear me out before you act.

This is a good time to remember who we are–the people God has gathered to be the Body of Christ in the world, the community of Christ’s presence, and the people who offer a glimpse of what the coming Kingdom of God will look like.  The problem we have is that the church is full of people, and worse, sinful, reprehensible, short-sighted, selfish, people (and these are the ones we call “the saints”).  For 2,000 years the church has been a frustrating and disappointing cesspool of human pride, prejudice, and failing.  But it has also been the place where God meets us with his grace, forgiveness, healing, and inspiration to do something about the brokenness in the world around us.  Indeed, if the church was a place where everyone were paragons of virtue, morality, and wisdom, it would be . . . well . . . plastic, and really dull.  As it is, it is the church is living, breathing, good, bad, ugly, and sometimes great, profound, and amazing.  It is where God meets us and invites us to wrestle with what being human and God’s people mean.

For those who are angered–incensed!–by GC2019’s decision and considering walking away, please step back for a moment.  Take the space provided by Lent to breath, pray, think.  And discern where you are called to ministry.  Maybe, in this season of your discontent, your ministry may be in staying and channeling your anger, as Jesus did with the sick man, and helping your church here in the place where you worship and serve, do its best ministry to the world through its worship, teaching, and service.

Keep the faith!

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